Freud Museum London: Psychoanalysis Podcasts A treasure trove of ideas in psychoanalysis, exploring its history and theory, and bringing psychoanalytic perspectives to bear on a diverse range of topics. Freud Museum website: www.freud.org.uk

December 5, 2014  
Author's Talk: John Launer with Dr Graham Music

Who was Sabina Spielrein? Her dramatic life story is most famous for her notorious affair with Carl Jung, dramatised in the film A Dangerous Method starring Keira Knightley. Yet she was a woman who overcame family and psychiatric abuse to become an original thinker in the field of sexual psychotherapy.

Drawing on thorough and novel research into Spielrein’s diaries, professional papers and correspondence, Sex Versus Survival is the first biography to put her life and ideas at the centre of the story. John Launer examines Spielrein’s tumultuous affair with Jung and its influence on both of their lives and intellectual journeys, and her key role in the rift between Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud, and in the development of psychoanalysis.

A Russian Jew, who lost her life in the Holocaust in 1942, Spielrein’s innovative theories have chiefly been suppressed because of her gender. Sex Versus Survival is a significant stage in the rediscovery of the life and ideas of an extraordinary woman and an acknowledgment of her prominent role in the history of sexual psychology.

John Launer was on the senior staff of the Tavistock Clinic in London, the leading training institute in the UK for psychological treatment, and is now an Associate Dean for postgraduate medical education at the University of London. He is a doctor and family therapist, and a renowned medical columnist both nationally and internationally.

The talk will be chaired by Dr Graham Music, Consultant Psychotherapist at the Tavistock and Portman Clinics, author of The Good Life and Nurturing Natures.

Part of a season of talks and events accompanying the exhibition 'Freud and Eros: Love, Lust and Longing', 22 October 2014 - 22 February 2015.
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November 1, 2014  
Author's Talk: Laurel Braitman

Charles Darwin developed his evolutionary theories by looking at physical differences in Galapagos finches and fancy pigeons. Alfred Russell Wallace investigated a range of creatures in the Malay Archipelago. Laurel Braitman got her lessons closer to home—by watching her dog. Oliver snapped at flies that only he could see, ate Ziploc bags, towels, and cartons of eggs. He suffered debilitating separation anxiety, was prone to aggression, and may even have attempted suicide. Her experience with Oliver forced Laurel to acknowledge a form of continuity between humans and other animals that, first as a biology major and later as a PhD student at MIT, she’d never been taught in school. Nonhuman animals can lose their minds. And when they do, it often looks a lot like human mental illness.

‘A gem ... that can teach us much about the wildness of our own minds’ — Psychology Today

‘A lovely, big-hearted book’ — The New York Times

LAUREL BRAITMAN has written about science, animals and other topics for Cabinet, Orion, The New Inquiry and other publications. She received her PhD in history and anthropology of science from MIT and is an affiliate artist at the Headlands Center for the Arts, and a TED fellow. She lives on a houseboat in Sausalito, California.
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The god of love is one of the best represented deities in Freud's impressive collection of antiquities. Join Dr Burke, the exhibition's curator, as she discusses the profound connections between classical Greek culture, the artworks collected by Freud and the development of psychoanalysis. Freud understood the god well: Eros could spark the civilizing force of love that resulted in fulfilling relationships as well as unleashing turbulent, unbridled and destructive emotions. Dr Burke will also draw on Freud's personal experience of Eros in his passionate courtship of his future wife Martha Bernays.

Dr Janine Burke is the author of The Gods of Freud: Sigmund Freud's Art Collection (2006). She is Adjunct Lecturer, School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University, Melbourne.

Part of a season of talks and events accompanying the exhibition 'Freud and Eros: Love, Lust and Longing' 22 October 2014 - 22 February 2015.
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October 31, 2014  
David Welch will discuss how one of the most striking means by which different propaganda media have influenced social and political attitudes, changing or reinforcing them has been through the use of stereotypes - conventional figures that have come to be regarded as representative of particular classes, races, nations, etc. Drawing largely from the experience of war or conflict, the talk will use propaganda artefacts such as pamphlets, postcards, cartoons, film and TV.

David Welch is Professor of Modern History & Director of the Centre for the Study of War, Propaganda & Society at the University of Kent. His publications include The Third Reich: Politics, and Propaganda (Routledge, 2002), Hitler: Profile of a Dictator (Routledge, 2001), Propaganda and the German Cinema, 1933-1945 (OUP, 1983 revised edition I.B.Tauris, 2001), Propaganda and Mass Persuasion: A Historical Encyclopedia from 1500 to the Present [with D. Culbert and N. Cull] (ABC Clio, 2003), Justifying War: Propaganda, Politics and the Modern Age [with Jo Fox] (Palgrave, 2012) and he edited contributed two chapters to a festschrift for Philip Taylor, Propaganda. From World War 1 to WikiLeaks (I.B.Tauris, 2013). In 2013, he co-curated the successful British Library exhibition, ‘Propaganda: Power and Persuasion’ and authored the accompanying book of the same name (British Library, 2013) His latest book published in August is, Germany and Propaganda in World War I. Pacifism, Mobilization and Total War (I.B. Tauris, 2014). He is currently writing a history of propaganda in the Second World War, World War II Propaganda. Documents Decoded (ABC-Clio, 2015) and he has contributed to the Oxford Illustrated History of World War II (OUP, 2015).

This talk is part of a series of events accompanying the exhibition 'Why War', 6 August - 19 October 2014.
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October 31, 2014  
As part of the Museum's Why War? exhibition Gabrielle Rifkind and Giandomenico Picco the recent authors of The Fog of Peace: The Human Face of Conflict Resolution will be in conversation with journalist, writer and broadcaster, John McCarthy.

In their thought provoking and important book, the authors of The Fog of Peace stress the importance of getting into the mind of the other, however difficult that is.

In 1991 former UN official Giandomenico Picco negotiated the release of John McCarthy and others held hostage by Hezbollah in Lebanon, allowing himself to be abducted from the streets of Beirut to meet with the leadership of the kidnappers in the process. In these encounters he had a deep commitment to understanding the human mind and what motivates it, and to asking questions as to why people behave in particular ways. He understood that behind every face there was a human story, indeed more than one, there was a life and there were hopes and aspirations, fears and anger, hatred and pain.

John McCarthy says of The Fog of Peace '"This remarkable and refreshing book offers an extremely practical new approach to finding a path through the fogs of war and peace. The authors argue that using the tool of empathy and getting into the mind of the enemy is not appeasement. This book is anything but soft and cuddly, it is based on a deep understanding of politics in its most brutal forms".

The conversation will offer the opportunity to explore the difficulties and opportunities for making peace. In today’s fractured world.

Gabrielle Rifkind is the director of the Middle East programme at Oxford Research Group. She is a group analyst and specialist in conflict resolution immersed in the politics of the Middle East. Rifkind combines in-depth political and psychological expertise with many years’ experience in promoting serious analysis and discreet dialogues with groups behind the scenes.

Giandomenico Picco served as under-secretary general of the United Nations and was personal representative of the secretary general for the United Nation year of dialogue amongst civilisations. He led the task force negotiations to end the Iran-Iraq war and the freedom of Western hostages from Lebanon. Over decades he helped securing the freedom of over 100 individuals unjustly detained from 4 different countries.

John Patrick McCarthy CBE is a British journalist, writer and broadcaster, and one of the hostages in the Lebanon hostage crisis. McCarthy was Britain's longest-held hostage in Lebanon, being held for more than five years.
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October 27, 2014  
Dr Joanne Morra 
Part of Inside Out Festival 2014

The Freud Museum London is internationally recognized as one of the most important sites for the history of psychoanalysis. Perhaps less well-known is the fact that over the past 25 years it has hosted over 70 contemporary art exhibitions by celebrated artists such as Louise Bourgeois, Sophie Calle, Matt Collishaw, Vera Frenkel and Sarah Lucas.

What is the purpose of these exhibitions? How do these artistic interventions animate the Museum? What can they tell us about psychoanalysis and contemporary art? Looking at selected previous exhibitions, as well as the forthcoming ‘Freud and Eros: Love, Lust and Longing’, this talk will address these questions and others.

Dr Joanne Morra is Reader in Art History and Theory at Central Saint Martins and a Founding Principal Editor of Journal of Visual Culture. Joanne has published widely on modern and contemporary art, critical theory and psychoanalytic theory and practice. Recently she curated the exhibition Saying It, with work by Mieke Bal & Michelle Williams Gamaker, and Renate Ferro at the Freud Museum, London (2012). Joanne is presently completing the book Inside the Freud Museums: Art, Curating and Site-Responsivity (I.B. Tauris, 2015).

This lecture is part of Inside Out Festival 2014 and one of a wide ranging and imaginative public programme of events, talks, films and performances which accompanies the exhibition 'Freud and Eros: Love, Lust and Longing', 22 October - 22 February 2015. 
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October 3, 2014  

Colette Soler, joined by Darian Leader

Lacan’s work is often caricatured as arcane, convoluted, ‘theoretical’ and, above all, difficult. But Lacan himself engaged continually with the ideas of his contemporaries and grounded his work in analytic practice. If you have been put off reading Lacan in the past, here is a chance to see what the fuss is about, in a way that relates directly to clinical work and wider issues of the world we live in.

Colette Soler - Psychoanalyst, Founder Member of the Ecole de Psychanalyse des Forums du Champ Lacanien. Her books include What Lacan said about Women (Other Press, 2006) and Lacanian Affects (Routledge, 2014).

Darian Leader - British psychoanalyst and author. He is a founding member of the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research (CFAR), President of the College of Psychoanalysts, a Trustee of the Freud Museum, and Honorary Visiting Professor in Psychoanalysis at Roehampton University.

This recording may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.

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October 2, 2014  
Paul Verhaeghe in conversation with Lisa Appignanesi

In What about Me? Paul Verhaeghe’s main concern is how social change has led to a psychic crisis and altered the way we think about ourselves. He investigates the effects of 30 years of neoliberalism, free-market forces, privatisation, and the relationship between our engineered society and individual identity. It turns out that who we are is, as always, determined by the context in which we live. Tonight he discusses these concerns with Lisa Appignanesi, former Chair of the Freud Museum and author most recently of Trials of Passion: Crimes in the Name of Love and Madness.

Paul Verhaeghe PhD, is senior professor at Ghent University and holds the chair of the department for psychoanalysis and counselling psychology. He has published eight books, with five translated into English. Love in a Time of Loneliness became an international bestseller and What about Me? has been reprinted ten times within its first year of publication.
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September 21, 2014  
Adam Phillips in conversation with Lisa Appignanesi
 
Adam Phillips, one of the world’s foremost authorities on Freud discusses his strikingly original new biography of the father of psychoanalysis, Becoming Freud: The Making of a Psychoanalyst (Yale University Press 2014), with Lisa Appignanesi, former Chair of the Freud Museum London and author most recently of Trials of Passion: Crimes in the Name of Love and Madness.
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July 15, 2014  

Di Massimo and Salecl analyse recent projects of Di Massimo's art practice such as ‘The Lustful Turk’ (2012/13), ‘Me Mum Mister Mad’ (2014) and his recent show at Rowing. The discussion will explore these projects under the lens of Salecl’s psychoanalytic approach, especially focusing on her essay ‘Love and Sexual Difference’ published in Sexuation (2000), a book of essays on Lacan's theories of sexual difference. The conversation will then evolve towards Salecl's last books, On Anxiety (2004) and Tyranny of Choice (2010), discussing the different approaches these works give rise to in contemporary artistic practice today.

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July 7, 2014  

Dany Nobus: It's a Poor Sort of Memory that Only Works Backwards

In this paper, I will argue that the controversial issue concerning the truth value of human memories is in itself a false debate. With reference to the reality of the event that is being recalled, memories are always by definition false. In terms of the subjective experience of the one who is remembering, they are always by definition true. Hence, from a psychoanalytic perspective memories are always simultaneously objectively false and subjectively true, and this can be the starting point for a re-evaluation of Freud's significance for contemporary 'scientific' discussions on the substance and function of memory.
 
Sharon Kivland: Last Year
I am trying to remember a film. It is film about the construction of memory (I think), as it might take place during a psychoanalysis, though I have only half an hour today rather than several years. I have watched the film, as I have done many times before, since 1970 in fact; this time, for a week, trying not to fall asleep at the point I have fallen asleep in it for the last forty-three years. Each time I have awoken, I have tried to remember what I saw last, before I slept. This is a film reconstructed through memory. This is a screen memory. In a series of flashbacks, I try to go back to a founding moment – I do not believe this to be true, but it still works.
 
Alasdair Hopwood: Closing Remarks
 
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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July 7, 2014  

Martin Conway: False Memories in the Remembering-Imaging System

What do memories represent? At best they represent some fragments derived from our experience of a past event. That ‘experience’ may have intersected with ‘reality’ to some degree. So the fragments preserved in memory derive from our experience of reality, also to some degree. The brain non-consciously and automatically ‘fills in’, by making unconscious inferences, much of the detail of a ‘memory’. Memories are constructed in the remembering-imaging system (RIS), where future events are also imagined, as well alternative pasts. In this paper I consider how errors and false memories can arise in the RIS for past and future events.
 
Chris French: Memory for Trauma
This talk will present an overview of research investigating the nature of memory for traumatic events with a particular focus upon examining the Freudian notion of repression. The idea that the experience of trauma often results in the automatic and involuntary repression of memories into the unconscious mind is critically assessed and the risk that the search for such memories can result in the production of false memories is discussed.

These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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July 7, 2014  
Alasdair Hopwood: Introductory Remarks

Fiona Gabbert: The Psychology of False Memory
Is it possible to develop a 'memory' for something that was not experienced? Plenty of evidence now exists to suggest that it is possible ...but how does this happen, and can we distinguish false memories from our 'real' memories? This seminar provides an overview of how psychologists investigate the phenomenon of false memories, and what the findings can tell us about how our memories work. The implications of this body of research will also be discussed with reference to real life examples.

These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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June 26, 2014  

Paul Coldwell (University of the Arts London) discusses his work exploring the relations between art, the archive, the uncanny and the museum. With Carol Seigel, Director of the Freud Museum.


Artist Paul Coldwell’s work is centred on our relationship to objects and how meanings can be projected onto them. This exhibition is the result of visual research in the archives of the Bethlem Royal Hospital and the Freud Museum, and engages with notions of anxiety, self-perception, worth and identity.

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June 3, 2014  
Author's Talk: Roger Kennedy with Josh Cohen

Roger Kennedy, psychoanalyst, former president of The British Psychoanalytical Society and author of Twelve books including The Many Voices of Psychoanalysis (Routledge, 2007), discusses his latest publication The Psychic Home: Psychoanalysis of Consciousness and the Human Soul (Routledge, 2014) with Josh Cohen, psychoanalyst, Professor of Modern Literary Theory at Goldsmiths University of London and author of the acclaimed The Private Life: Why We Remain in the Dark (Granta, 2013).

The Psychic Home: Psychoanalysis of Consciousness and the Human Soul develops, from a number of different viewpoints, the significance of home in our lives. Roger Kennedy puts forward the central role of what he has termed a ‘psychic home’ as a vital psychic structure, which gathers together a number of different human functions. Kennedy questions what we mean by the powerfully evocative notion of the human soul, which has important links to the notion of home and he suggests that what makes us human is that we allow a home for the soul.

Insightful, enlightening and broad reaching, The Psychic Home brings the concept of the soul centre stage as an entity that is elemental, an essence, irreducible, and what makes us human as subjects of experience. Essential reading for psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, neuroscientists, philosophers and those interested in spirituality and religion.
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June 2, 2014  
Emily A. Kuriloff 

During the 1930s and 1940s, European psychoanalysts held fast to their professional identities despite a profoundly destabilizing reality. From Budapest to Paris the Nazis disrupted the work of this group and threatened their very lives. That psychoanalysis endured, and even flourished in postwar Europe and the Americas, is itself remarkable. And yet, in the end, the 20th century belonged as much to Freud as it did to Hitler.

In her recent book Psychoanalysis and the Legacy of the Third Reich Emily Kuriloff explores the myriad ways in which theory and praxis – and thus the course of psychoanalysis – has been and continues to be influenced by this history. In tonight’s talk she will focus particularly on the British experience before and after the Second World War.

Kuriloff’s work leans heavily on personal interviews conducted with analysts who lived during the period, and who frequented the Freud house in Hampstead, consulting and commiserating with their displaced leader and his daughter and heir apparent, Anna. Their narratives bring an immediacy and nuance to a terrible and auspicious time.

Emily A. Kuriloff is a Psychologist and Psychoanalyst. She is in private practice in New York City and she is Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst at the William Alanson White Institute, New York.
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May 29, 2014  
Lisa Appignanesi in Conversation with Dany Nobus

In her latest book - Trials of Passion: Crimes in the Name of Love and Madness (Virago/Little Brown) - Lisa Appignanesi takes us into the theatre of the courtroom to witness the fascinating interplay between the law, which presupposes a person in the dock fully in charge of acts and understanding, the accused who may be derailed by passion or trapped in a delusional system, and judge, jury and the psychiatrists whose expertise as witnesses was founded on a knowledge of extreme emotion.  She discusses crimes of passion and the rise of the forensic psychiatrist with Dany Nobus, psychoanalyst and Pro Vice-Chancellor of Brunel University.
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May 29, 2014  
Volker M. Welter 

Freud. The name is synonymous with psychoanalysis. Lesser known, however, is Ernst Freud, the architect son of Sigmund who designed modern homes for mainly bourgeois clients. Freud attended Adolf Loos’s private Bauschule in Vienna, practiced in Berlin after the Great War, and, from 1933 onwards, in London. The talk will focus on Freud’s modern architecture in London, which will be compared with examples from his time in Berlin. The talk will also present Ernst Freud’s designs of psychoanalytic consulting rooms and couches; the son of the founder of psychoanalysis was one of the first architects to design this type of professional space.

Volker M. Welter is an architectural historian who has lived, studied, and worked in Germany, Scotland, and England, and is now a Professor for Californian and European modern architectural history and theory at the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, University of California at Santa Barbara. His publications include Biopolis—Patrick Geddes and the City of Life (Cambridge, Ma.: MIT Press, 2002), Ernst L. Freud, Architect: The Case of the Modern Bourgeois Home (Oxford/New York: Berghahn, 2012). He is currently working on a book entitled Tremaine Houses: A Study in mid-twentieth-century Patronage of Modern American Architecture.
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April 28, 2014  
Co-chairs: Graham Clarke, Ivan Ward and David Scharff
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April 28, 2014  
Chairs: David Scharff and Earl Hopper
Julian Lousada: Psychoanalysis Goes to Market?
Stephen Frosh: What Passes, Passes By: Why the Psychosocial is not (Just) Relational
Ron Aviram: The Large Group in Mind (With Special Reference to Prejudice, War and Terrorism)
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April 28, 2014  
Chair: James Poulton
Ruben Basili: Recent Work from Argentina's Espacio Fairbairn
Recording: Reflections on Fairbairn from Otto Kernberg and John Sutherland
Hilary Beattie: Fairbairn and Homosexuality: Personal Struggles amid Psychoanalytic Controversy
Discussion

These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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April 28, 2014  
Chair: Graham Clarke
Eleanore Armstrong-Perlman: The Zealots and the Blind: Sexual Abuse Scandals from Freud to Fairbairn
Carlos Rodriquez-Still: Fairbairn's Contribution to Understanding Personality Disorders
Valerie Sinason: Abuse, Trauma and Multiplicity
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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April 28, 2014  
Chair: Jill Scharff
Lesley Caldwell: Being at Home with One's Self: The Condition of Psychic Aliveness?
Anne Alvarez: Paranoid-Schizoid Position or Paranoid and Schizoid Positions?
Graham Clarke: Psychic Growth and Creativity
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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April 28, 2014  
Chair: Carlos Rodriguez-Sutil
Joseph Schwartz: Fairbairn and the Good Object: A bone of contention
Molly Ludlam: Fairbairn and the Couple: Still a Creative Threesome?
Jill Scharff: Fairbairn's Clinical Theory (edited)

These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.

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April 28, 2014  
Chair: David Scharff
Steven Levine: Fairbairn's Theory of the Visual Arts and its Influence
Jonathan Sklar: Discussion of Steven Levine's Presentation
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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April 28, 2014  
Chair: Lea Sutton
Marie Hoffman: Fairbairn and Religion
James Poulton: Philosophical Foundations of Fairbairn
Gal Gerson: Hegelian Themes in Fairbairn's Work
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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April 28, 2014  
Chair: Aleksandar Dimitrijevic
 
Norka Malberg: On Being Recognized
Viviane Green: Internal Objects: Fantasy, Experience and History Intersecting?
David Scharff: Internal Objects and Internal Experience
 
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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April 14, 2014  
Martin Schmidt chaired by Jonathan Burke

The terrible loss of his friends, daughter and beloved grandson together with the relentless onslaught of his own cancer had a huge impact not only on Freud’s mood but also his writing. This change in direction reflected a darker, sombre tone in his prose. He started to use the language of death and destructiveness rather than pleasure seeking to explain the aetiology of anxiety, aggression and guilt.

From the detection of his illness until his death, he remained prolific, publishing over forty significant papers and major works including The Ego and the Id (1923b), Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety (1926d), The Future of an Illusion (1927c), Civilization and its Discontents (1930a) and Moses and Monotheism (1939). This talk, based on Martin’s chapter in The Topic of Cancer (2013, Ed. Jonathan Burke. Karnac, London), explores Freud’s final years and the dynamics at work in his writing.

Martin Schmidt MBPsS, is a Jungian analyst (Training Analyst of the Society of Analytical Psychology, London) psychologist and lecturer on the post-graduate arts therapies programmes at the Universities of Roehampton and Hertfordshire. He is in private practice in London and teaches widely both in the UK and abroad. His paper Psychic Skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions (Feb 2012, Vol 57, no 1) won the Fordham prize for best clinical paper in the Journal of Analytical Psychology in 2012 and was nominated for the Gradiva award by the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis, New York in 2013. His most recent publication is a chapter entitled Freud’s Cancer in The Topic of Cancer (Ed. J Burke, Karnac:2013). For over seven years, he has been a visiting supervisor/lecturer on the International Association of Analytical Psychology (IAAP) Russian Revival programme for the first trainee Jungian analysts in Moscow and St Petersburg. He is currently the IAAP liaison person for Serbia and provides support, teaching and supervision for Jungian analysts and trainees in Serbia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan.
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April 4, 2014  
DIE TRAUMDEUTUNG 75,32m AMSL

Artist Miroslaw Balka discusses his exhibition DIE TRAUMDEUTUNG 75,32m AMSL with exhibition Curator, James Putnam.

DIE TRAUMDEUTUNG 75,32m AMSL, is an exhibition of new site-specific works by Polish artist Miroslaw Balka. The exhibition title is a reference in German to Freud's key work The Interpretation of Dreams (1899), while the measurement in metres refers to the exact geographical height above mean sea level of The Freud Museum.

The exhibition is the latest in the critically acclaimed ongoing series of Freud Museum exhibitions curated by James Putnam that have included projects by Sophie Calle, Mat Collishaw, Sarah Lucas, Ellen Gallagher, Tim Noble & Sue Webster and Oliver Clegg.

DIE TRAUMDEUTUNG 75,32m AMSL will run concurrently with DIE TRAUMDEUTUNG 25,31m AMSL, at White Cube Mason's Yard.

The exhibition is kindly supported by White Cube and The Polish Cultural Institute.
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February 25, 2014  
PENNY GARNER is Founder and Clinical Director at Contented Dementia Trust. Penny’s work began as a direct result of her earlier experience gained whilst caring for her mother Dorothy, who was suffering from dementia. She then launched SPECAL as an independent charity based in the old community hospital in 2002, with the aim of promoting lifelong well-being for people with dementia. Penny has developed and refined a dedicated method of managing dementia called SPECAL, underpinned by the Photograph Album – an accessible tool to explain how memory works, the impact of ageing and a significant change introduced by dementia. It is described in detail in Contented Dementia, the best-selling book by Oliver James. Penny now lectures both at home and abroad and is currently developing a full Practitioner Training Programme to ensure her knowledge, skills and experience are passed onto others for the future.
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February 25, 2014  
OLIVER TURNBULL is a neuropsychologist and a clinical psychologist, Professor at the Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, and Pro Vice-Chancellor at Bangor University. He is the immediate past Editor of the Journal Neuropsychoanalysis, as well as Secretary of the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society, founded with the aim of reconciling psychoanalytic and neuroscientific perspectives on the mind. He was the recipient of the Clifford Yorke Prize in 2004. With Mark Solms, he wrote a book The Brain and the Inner World: An Introduction to the Neuroscience of Subjective Experience (2002) published by Karnac and was a contributing editor to From the Couch to the Lab: Trends in Psychodynamic Neuroscience (2012) published by Oxford University Press.
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February 24, 2014  

Lynne Segal and Susie Orbach in conversation


Feminist writer and activist, Lynne Segal, discusses her recently published Out of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Ageing with psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, social critic and writer Susie Orbach - author of many celebrated books, amongst them Bodies and On Eating, and recently co-edited Fifty Shades of Feminism, with Lisa Appignanesi and Rachel Holmes.

In her autobiography Making Trouble (2007), Segal described herself as ‘a reluctantly ageing woman’, and mused about the need for ‘a feminist sexual politics of ageing’. Out of Time is her answer to these issues.

Fears of ageing, Segal argues, are fed to us from childhood in stories and fairy tales full of monstrous, quintessentially female, figures. She confronts the simplistic attributions of generational blame frequently named as causes of the economic crisis, the growing erotic invisibility for ageing women as well as the expectations of gender and ageing that inevitably constrain ambition and political engagement. 

Out of Time also examines the representation of ageing in the work of other writers (many of them feminists) including Simone de Beauvoir, Alice Walker, Adrienne Rich, Philip Roth, Diane Athill, Joyce Carol Oates, John Berger, Grace Paley, Jo Brand, Jacques Derrida and John Updike.

Out of Time: The Pleasures and Perils of Ageing (Novemeber 2013) Verso 

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February 18, 2014  
In her study of women and the mind doctors 'Mad, Bad and Sad' and in her belle époque novel, 'Paris Requiem', Lisa Appignanesi draws on the same historical sources of inspiration. The Salpetriere Asylum in Paris, hysteria, as well as understandings of psychiatry and psychoanalysis inform her work across the genres, even her family memoir 'Losing the Dead'. In several of her works - the novel 'Where the Serpent Lives', the conservation memoir 'Tigers in Red Weather', and the poems, 'The Mara Crossing' - poet and writer, Ruth Padel also explores the same fount of material. What is it that so fascinates them about their subjects that they leave a residue to be treated in different forms of writing? And how does genre and form affect the way the 'real' is understood. 

The audio on this file was salvaged from a faulty recording. Because of this, the sound quality is lower than usual.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.

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February 3, 2014  

Jacqueline Rose and Sally Alexander in conversation

 
To conclude the 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors' season, Prof Jacqueline Rose and Prof Sally Alexander explore the complex history of hysteria and psychoanalysis in its relationship to women.
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January 27, 2014  

Chaired by Dr Estela Welldon. 


Are women who kill their children monsters? Actress Lisa Dwan has performed, to wide critical acclaim, French author Veronique Olmi’s play 'Beside the Sea', about a woman who kills her two children. Meike Ziervogel in her novel 'Magda' enters the head of the Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbel’s wife, who killed her six children.

Please note that Lisa Dwan's introductory reading has been cut from the podcast.

Joining Lisa and Meike will be Dr Amber Jacobs. Dr Jacobs lectures in the department of Psychosocial Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London. She is the author of On Matricide: Myth, Psychoanalysis and the Law of the Mother (Columbia University Press 2008) and has published other articles in the field of feminist theory, myth, psychoanalysis and visual culture.

The talk will be chaired by Dr Estela Welldon, psychoanalytical psychotherapist and author of Mother, Madonna, Whore: The Idealisation and Denigration of Motherhood (1988) and Playing with Dynamite: A Personal Approach to the Psychoanalytic Understanding of Perversions, Violence, and Criminality (2011).

In association with Peirene Press.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors' exhibition 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.

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January 14, 2014  

Three week evening course with Mary Wild


Session 2: DEMONS - hysteria in horror/melodrama
The Entity, Sunset Blvd., Black Narcissus, Possession, Teeth, The Piano Teacher

"What does it mean to be a woman?" "What does a woman want?" An exploration of female desire provides dynamically elusive answers to these eternal questions. Originating in ancient Greek notions of the 'wandering womb', hysteria was Sigmund Freud’s 'splendid child’, defined in his landmark Dora case study. The hysteric’s body is a theatre where irrepressible ghosts of past trauma are disguised in blindness, deafness, seizures and convulsions – she unconsciously shape-shifts into a medium of warped communication, her symptoms do all the talking for her. At the core of hysteria is a twisted fascination with beauty, so closely bound up with femininity that it runs the risk of replacing it. Through her identification with the male gaze, the hysteric becomes a tragic seductress, desiring the desire of the other. Exaggerated womanliness is the theme of this 'masquerade': the ultimate woman might be an imaginary one, a metaphysical alien-goddess, dreamed up by the male animal. "The woman does not exist," so said Lacan, and pandemonium ensued. But becoming a woman implies extraordinary transformation, at the very least. 

Hysteria has not disappeared from modern Western world; instead our culture manifests a hidden hysteria but does not recognise it. PROJECTIONS: CINEMA HYSTERIA is a three-part course by MARY WILD examining the central role of hysteria within different film genres (e.g., erotica/romance, horror/melodrama, fantasy/sci-fi). The mystery of femininity will be investigated psychoanalytically via the unconscious connection between the body and language. So rather than the wandering womb, it is in fact the exiled signifier that roams, creeping, searching for a mode of expression among possessed images on the cinema screen.

PROJECTIONS is psychoanalysis for film interpretation. PROJECTIONS empowers film spectators to express subjective associations they consider to be meaningful. Expertise in psychoanalytic theory is not necessary - the only prerequisite is the desire to enter and inhabit the imaginary world of film, which is itself a psychoanalytic act. MARY WILD, a Freudian cinephile from Montreal, is the creator of PROJECTIONS.


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January 13, 2014  

Professor Griselda Pollock

Griselda Pollock discusses some of the cases from her virtual feminist museum's exhibition on Trauma and Aesthetic Transformation in the aftermath of the publication of After-affects I After-Images: Trauma and Aesthetic Transformation in the Virtual Feminist Museum (Manchester University Press, 2013)

Professor Griselda Pollock is the Director, Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory & History (CentreCATH), and Professor of Social & Critical Histories of Art, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, University of Leeds.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.

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December 11, 2013  

Victoria Walker

Author Anna Kavan’s critical and popular reception since her death in 1968 has been defined by a cult of personality fuelled by revelations about her psychiatric breakdown, heroin use and adoption of her own fictional character’s name. Victoria Walker unravels some of the accumulated mythology around this writer, and examines her complex association with, and interest in, early twentieth-century psychiatry and psychotherapy.

As well as being treated in private asylums and nursing homes, Kavan underwent a short analysis at the Tavistock Clinic, experienced Ludwig Binswanger’s method of existential psychotherapy at the Bellevue Sanatorium, and had a close personal relationship with her longtime psychiatrist Karl Bluth. Kavan promoted a radical politics of madness, giving voice to the disenfranchised and marginalized psychiatric patient and presaging the anti-psychiatry movement.

Dr Victoria Walker’s research focuses on twentieth-century women writers and fictional representations of psychiatric treatment. She wrote the introduction to the recent edition of Kavan’s 'I Am Lazarus'. She teaches at King’s College, London and administers the Anna Kavan Society.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.

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December 11, 2013  

Dr Cleo Van Velsen in conversation with Dr Lisa Appignanesi

Dr Cleo Van Velsen is Consultant Psychiatrist in Forensic Psychotherapy in a Personality Disorder Medium Secure Unit in East London. She is also a psychoanalyst. Although this is a male unit she has experience in the assessment, management and treatment of women in forensic contexts - women who have suffered trauma and engaged in violence. She discusses her experiences of working with forensic patients with Lisa Appignanesi, whose soon to be published book 'Trials of Passion' explores the intersection of the law and psychiatry.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.


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December 3, 2013  
With a practice extending over 40 years, Susan Hiller is one of the most influential artists of her generation. Her ground-breaking installations, multi-screen videos and audio works have achieved international recognition and are widely acknowledged to be a major influence on younger British artists. Many of her works explore the liminality of phenomena including the practice of automatic writing (Sisters of Menon, 1972/79; Homage to Gertrude Stein, 2010) and collective experiences of unconscious, subconscious and paranormal activity (Dream Mapping, 1974; Belshazzar’s Feast, 1983-4; Dream Screens,1996; Psi Girls,1999; Witness, 2000).

In 1994 Hiller exhibited the critically acclaimed After the Freud Museum and in 2011 Tate Britain held a major retrospective of her work. In conversation with psychotherapist, psychoanalyst, writer and social critic Susie Orbach she talks candidly about her life and work.

Part of a season of talks and events accompanying the  exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014, of which Susan Hiller is an exhibiting artist.
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December 3, 2013  

Sarah Churchwell


In 1956 while filming The Prince and the Showgirl with Laurence Olivier, Marilyn Monroe suffered a crisis that brought her to see Anna Freud. Marilyn had a long history of encounters with the psychoanalytic profession. Her trajectory illuminates some of the difficulties celebrity engenders. Writer and broadcaster Prof. Sarah Churchwell, author of ‘Careless People: Murder, Mayhem and the Invention of The Great Gatsby’ and ‘The Many Lives of Marilyn Monroe’, discusses Marilyn's life.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.

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The affinity between Freud and Bloomsbury was obvious from 1910 and became productive when core members of the Bloomsbury group becoming psychoanalysts in the 1920s and the Hogarth Press became the official psychoanalytic publishing house. The lecture will explore the reasons for this affinity and also ask if the history of psychoanalysis in Britain has been radically different from other countries because of its original alliance with an entrenched anti-establishment elite from the English rentier class, both extremely well-connected and bohemian.

John Forrester is Professor of History and Philosophy of the Sciences in the University of Cambridge, author of 'Language and the Origins of Psychoanalysis' (1980), 'The Seductions of Psychoanalysis' (1990), (with Lisa Appignanesi) 'Freud’s Women' (1992), 'Dispatches from the Freud Wars' (1997) and 'Truth Games' (1997). He is completing (with Laura Cameron) 'Freud in Cambridge', a study of the reception of psychoanalysis in the 1920s. He is interested in reasoning in cases in science, medicine and law. He is Editor of Psychoanalysis and History.

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November 7, 2013  
Author's Talk: Josh Cohen

The war over private life spreads inexorably. Some seek to expose, invade and steal it, others to protect, conceal and withhold it. Either way, the assumption is that privacy is a possession to be won or lost. But what if what we call private life is the one element in us that we can't possess? Could it be that we're so intent on taking hold of the privacy of others, or keeping hold of our own only because we're powerless to do either? In this ground-breaking book, Josh Cohen uses his experience as a psychoanalyst, literature professor and human being to explore the conception of private life as the presence in us of someone else, an uncanny stranger both unrecognisable and eerily familiar, who can be neither owned nor controlled.

Drawing on a dizzying array of characters and concerns, from John Milton and Henry James to Katie Price and Snoopy, from philosophy and the Bible to pornography and late-night TV, The Private Life weaves a richly personal tapestry of ideas and experience. In a culture that floods our lives with light, it asks, how is it that we remain so helplessly in the dark?

Part of a season of talks and events accompanying the exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.
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November 4, 2013  
Sites of the Unconscious: Hypnosis and the Emergence of the Psychoanalytic Setting
Author's talk: Andreas Mayer introduced by John Forrester

In the late nineteenth century, scientists, psychiatrists, and medical practitioners began employing a new experimental technique for the study of neuroses: hypnotism. Though the efforts of the famous French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot to transform hypnosis into a laboratory science failed, his Viennese translator and disciple Sigmund Freud took up the challenge and invented psychoanalysis. Previous scholarship has viewed hypnosis and psychoanalysis in sharp opposition or claimed that both were ultimately grounded in the phenomenon of suggestion and thus equally flawed. In this groundbreaking study, Andreas Mayer reexamines the relationship between hypnosis and psychoanalysis, revealing that the emergence of the familiar Freudian psychoanalytic setting cannot be understood without a detailed analysis of the sites, material and social practices, and controversies within the checkered scientific and medical landscape of hypnotism.

Sites of the Unconscious analyzes the major controversies between competing French schools of hypnotism that emerged at this time, stressing their different views on the production of viable evidence and their different ways of deploying hypnosis. Mayer then reconstructs in detail the reception of French hypnotism in German-speaking countries, arguing that the distinctive features of Freud’s psychoanalytic setting of the couch emerged out of the clinical laboratories and private consulting rooms of the practitioners of hypnosis.

Sites of the Unconscious: Hypnosis and the Emergence of the Psychoanalytic Setting is published by Chicago/London: Chicago University Press, 2013

After studying musicology in his native Vienna, Andreas Mayer turned to the history and sociology of science with studies in Paris, Cambridge and Bielefeld. His work centers on various topics in the history of the human sciences, the entangled relationship between music, literature, the arts and the sciences in the modern period, and most notably the emergence of psychoanalysis and its related discourses and practices. His major publications include Dreaming by the Book: A History of Freud's "The Interpretation of Dreams" and the Psychoanalytic Movement (2003).

John Forrester is Professor of History and Philosophy of the Sciences in the University of Cambridge, author of Language and the Origins of Psychoanalysis (1980), The Seductions of Psychoanalysis (1990), (with Lisa Appignanesi) Freud’s Women (1992), Dispatches from the Freud Wars (1997) and Truth Games (1997). He is completing (with Laura Cameron) Freud in Cambridge, a study of the reception of psychoanalysis in the 1920s. He is interested in reasoning in cases in science, medicine and law. He is Editor of 'Psychoanalysis and History.

Part of a season of performances, talks, films and events accompanying the forthcoming exhibition 'Mad, Bad and Sad: Women and the Mind Doctors', 10 October 2013 - 2 February 2014.
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October 28, 2013  

Closing Discussion: Internal and External Reality: The Ferenczi Project

Facilitator: Kathleen Kelley-Lainé
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October 28, 2013  
Panel 8: Psychoanalysis and Politics

Sincerity and Freedom in Psychoanalysis: a studio conference inspired by Sándor Ferenczi's Clinical Diary
18-20 October 2013

Ferenc Erős - Freedom and Authority in the Clinical Diary
Jonathan Sklar - Psychoanalysis, Analytic Societies and the European Unconscious

Facilitator: Lene Auestad

Ferenc Erős - Freedom and Authority in the Clinical Diary
In my paper I will examine the challenges of some twentieth century political theories and ideologies (like Marxism, socialism, feminism, postmodern thinking) for psychoanalysis. I will raise the question: after the experiences of historical traumata, totalitarianism and dictatorships, what psychoanalysis today can say about the non-traumatic, democratic social processes and about the threats they have to face with. To attempt to outline a possible answer, I will go back to Ferenczi’s early writings that explicitly deal with social and political issues, especially to his manuscript “Psychoanalysis and liberal socialism”. I will also discuss the ethical and political-philosophical implications of Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary, especially for the concept of freedom and authority.

Jonathan Sklar - Psychoanalysis, Analytic Societies and the European Unconscious
In this paper I address the impact of transgenerational conflict on European analysis and Societies.
How can one think about trauma in the individual without thinking of it in generational terms? In a similar way the cultural heritage that formed the backdrop to the development of psychoanalysis from within the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its aftermath has its own value transmitting unconscious imprints on analytic societies. What are the interfaces between personal and historical trauma, and in particular the interface with unconscious processes? Totalitarian regimes in the 20th century have, of course, had a massive impact on Europe including analytic societies, which I will argue is ongoing. How can the mind take a measure of history, when history will submit neither to the reason of the world nor to the mind that confronts it?
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October 28, 2013  

Panel 7: Ferenczi and Others


Sincerity and Freedom in Psychoanalysis: a studio conference inspired by Sándor Ferenczi's Clinical Diary
18-20 October 2013

Tom Keve - The Jung-Ferenczi Dossier
Isabel Halton - Mrs Klein and the Diary
Yves Lugrin - Lacan-Ferenczi … a paradoxical kinship?

Facilitator: Giselle Galdi

Tom Keve - The Jung-Ferenczi Dossier
The acquaintance between Ferenczi and C G Jung, pre-dates their first encounter with Sigmund Freud. Later, a triangular relationship developed when the three men crossed the Atlantic together and spent an extended period in one another’s company. Ferenczi’s friendship with Jung could not survive the latter’s break with Freud, but it’s development between 1907 and 1913 is evidenced by unpublished letters from Jung to Ferenczi, found in the Ferenczi Archive, now at the Freud Museum.

Isabel Halton - Mrs Klein and the Diary
In 1959 Klein wrote “While living in Budapest. I had become interested in psycho-analysis…I went into analysis with Ferenczi, who was the most outstanding Hungarian analyst, and he very much encouraged my idea of devoting myself to analysis, particularly child analysis, for which he said I had a particular talent.”
Ferenczi had an important influence on Melanie Klein’s ideas. In this talk I want to look at the clinical diaries and try to map the kind of influence he had on Mrs Klein’s work.

Yves Lugrin - Lacan-Ferenczi … a paradoxical kinship?
“In my teaching, I always give a special consideration to Ferenczi’s spiritual line of thought” : here is what Lacan confides in 1953 to M. Balint, “one of the best trained psychoanalysts in Ferenczi’s school of authenticity”. Nevertheless, this tribute paid to the author of “the luminous paper on psychoanalytical elasticity” is not given without strict, sometimes unfair criticism.
Moreover, from 1963 onwards, Ferenczi seems to disappear from Lacan’s horizon of thought, most of his students neglecting Ferenczi’s crucial role in the history of psychoanalysis, and failing to realize that his work should not be forgotten. Yet today, more than thirty years after Lacan’s death, we discover that in his own destiny as an psychoanalyst, he remained stangely loyal to “the passion for analyzing” that he early detected in Ferenczi whom he considered as “the most pertinent” among the pioneers “in his questioning what is required from the psychoanalyst, and specially about the end of the cure”
Each in his own psychoanalytical singularity, Lacan and Ferenczi were both “the most tormented by the psychoanalytical action”. But was it the same torment? And what were the differences?
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October 28, 2013  

Panel 6: Therapeutic Ethics and Analytic Concepts


Sincerity and Freedom in Psychoanalysis: a studio conference inspired by Sándor Ferenczi's Clinical Diary
18-20 October 2013

Julia Borossa - Translating Ferenczi’s Therapeutic Ethics for our Time: The Question of Being Alongside
Hayuta Gurevich - The Return of Dissociation as Absence within Absence

Facilitator: Antal Bókay

Julia Borossa - Translating Ferenczi’s Therapeutic Ethics for our Time: The Question of Being Alongside
Ferenczi’s practice and therapeutic ethics as exemplified in the Clinical Diary reveal a profound sensitivity to the question of authority and freedom. This paper will engage with the ways in which this question has been taken up elsewhere and has become central to post war extensions of the psychoanalytic field, such as group analysis. A particular comparison will be made with group analytic notions of leadership and horizontal ways of relating, ie how to be alongside one another. It will be suggested that the translation of Ferenczi for our time opens up onto the question of the adaptability of psychoanalysis to different and changing socio-political contexts.

Hayuta Gurevich - The Return of Dissociation as Absence within Absence
My aim is to translate Ferenczi’s central concepts of the intrapsychic impact and imprint of early developmental trauma into both revived and contemporary conceptualizations.
The concept of dissociation was central to the Seduction Theory renounced by Freud, yet it is returning as a cornerstone of recent Trauma Theories. Ferenczi, following Freud, usually used the concepts of repression and splitting, but definitely used them in the sense of an intrapsychic imprint of early external trauma, that is – as dissociation, i.e., fragmentation of consciousness itself. Furthermore, early trauma is double: an absence of protection that threatens existence of the self, combined with an absence of attachment and of recognition of this threat and terror; thus – an absence-within-absence. This contemporary conceptualization entails a widening of the intrapsychic realm to include an intersubjective one, and regards dissociation as a unique and complex intrapsychic absence, which is a negative of the external absence-within-absence in the early environment.
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October 28, 2013  

Panel 5: Kino-Analytic Panel


Sincerity and Freedom in Psychoanalysis: a studio conference inspired by Sándor Ferenczi's Clinical Diary
18-20 October 2013

Two films by Em Cooper, introduced and discussed by Kata Lénárd and Petra Kovács, with Em Cooper. 

Facilitator: Kanaan Navaratnam

British film director Em Cooper was inspired by Sándor Ferenczi’s ‘confusion of tongues’ theory. The film (2010) of the same title combines animation and live action seeking to capture the chaotic inner experiences, complex psychic, perceptual and memory distortions of the person suffering from trauma.

Please note that the films themselves have been cut from this recording.


Confusion of Tongues
The short film – using only a scarce number of words – depicts with incredible power a trauma that can hardly be recounted verbally. Rapid changing of images, colours and shapes, the transitions of contoured and obscure, shifts between ’real’ and ’imaginary’ figures – this visual montage synthesizes multiple ideas in a powerful visual language. The blending of animation and live action creates a chaotic, surreal world that is both frightening and moving. The film, as a work coming into existence in transitional space, zooms in and out.

Em Cooper’s movie helps encounter what is incomprehensible, inexplicable and impossible to apprehend.

The film is about a young woman haunted by a recurring childhood memory. Gripped by her fear of a window left open she begins to recall a much deeper trauma. Likewise in some sentences of the Ferenczi-essay, heavy layers of meanings are building upon each other through the images of the movie. The text and special language of the original paper is turned into a visual language with astounding accuracy – thus the inner content of the coherent text, the non-narratibility of the trauma are transformed into an experience affecting our primary senses through images and sounds difficult to reflect (upon) and integrate.

In our lecture we observe the role of live action and animation in capturing the dynamics of confusion of tongues and how it affects the receivers/audience. How is confusion of tongues portrayed today in an animation employing oil-painting technology? What extra meanings are given by images, colours and sounds to the issues of seduction and trauma, construction and reconstruction, narrative and objective truth? The real, live hand, flashing onto the screen, sketching up the animation parts of the film may also actuate thoughts concerning the processing of the trauma.

The Nest and trauma
The short film of British film director Em Cooper The Nest (2010) tells the parallel story of a domestic abuse. The very same morning is shown first from the mother’s point of view, then from her daughter’s angle. The ”dissociated” images of the film blur the line between past and present, fantasy and reality, mother’s and daughter’s story. Is it the mother’s or the daughter’s trauma? Or the trauma suffered by the mother is mirrored in fantasy, and this unprocessed trauma presents itself in the dynamics of the father-daughter relationship, or even, in all three lives?

After watching the film we will discuss how stories that are verbally ’non-narratable’ but live deep inside us can emerge, come back to life, be animated through various media, e.g. the visual arts. The director employs the ambiguity, “double senses” (M.L. Hernandez) immanent in animation to represent the interplay between fiction and reality. The intermediality of animation and live action helps getting to a closer understanding of domestic violence, the dynamics of abuse and transgenerational trauma.

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October 28, 2013  

Panel 4: From Babies to Maturity


Sincerity and Freedom in Psychoanalysis: a studio conference inspired by Sándor Ferenczi's Clinical Diary
18-20 October 2013

Shaul Bar-Haim - “Infants do not love; they must be loved”: Omnipotence, dependency and the Ferenczian notion of childhood
Antal Bókay - The Idea of the Child – Ferenczi and Others
Julianna Vamos - Free to Move – Free to Be
Kathleen Kelley-Lainé - Freedom to Grow: Inspired by Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary

Facilitator: Gianna Williams

Shaul Bar-Haim - “Infants do not love; they must be loved”: Omnipotence, dependency and the Ferenczian notion of childhood
On the 7th of August 1932, Sandor Ferenczi wrote in his Clinical Diary the following words: “The newborn child uses all its libido for its own growth; indeed, it must be given additional libido to ensure that it grows normally. Normal life thus begins with exclusive, passive object-love. Infants do not love; they must be loved” (Clinical Diary, 189). This quotation represents Ferenczi’s much wider understanding of childhood, as he perceived it in the early 1930s – the last years of his life. In a series of notable publications, he portrayed childhood as a state of passivity, dependency and weakness. In order to survive, he argued, children must not only learn their carers’ formal language, but also to fully internalize their carers’ unconscious wishes and desires. To survive, he believed, children must develop an ability to ‘identify with an aggressor’, who he often saw as being their own parents. Childhood, according to the later writings of Ferenczi, is a matter of survival.
But this was not always the case. In his early psychoanalytical works, and mainly in his influential essay, ‘Stages in the Development of the Sense of Reality’, published in 1913, Ferenczi had a different picture of infancy and early childhood. Children, he then thought, are motivated by their feelings of omnipotence. From a very early stage, perhaps from the moment of birth, they perceive themselves as capable and powerful beings. According to this perception of childhood, infants believe in their power to make their carers attune to their needs rather than to attune themselves to their carers’ desires.
So what happened to the ‘Ferenczian child’ between ‘The Stages of Development’ and ‘The Clinical Diary’? My aim is to provide a short history of the changes in Ferenczi’s concept of childhood, during the two decade period, 1913-1932. This might help us to have a better picture of the ways in which Ferenczi thought of childhood – from a state of ‘omnipotence’ to a state of what he famously described as a ‘confusion of tongues’. It will also be argued that the reasons for this change are not solely related to Ferenczi’s own personal life, but also to some historically major changes in the psychoanalytical understanding of childhood, and the emergence of child-psychoanalysis after the First World War.

Antal Bókay - The Idea of the Child – Ferenczi and Others
The paper discusses the idea of the child as a projection, a construction of the self in psychoanalysis and in literature. The major “psychoanalytic philosopher” of the idea of the child was Sándor Ferenczi who wrote several important papers (pre-eminently, the “Confusion of tongues between adults and the child”) and discussed the theme in his Clinical Diary. Ferenczi’s reflections on the meaning of trauma and seduction for understanding neurosis and mental illness lead to a powerful restatement of the distinction between the child and the adult and of the anthropological difference that is connected to it. For Ferenczi the trauma is not only the cause of neurosis but also a constitutive factor of human subjectivity. The child, who resides in us, is a trauma product, a deeply hidden special narrative, a heterogeneous unfolding of inner energies inscripted by early primary events as signifiers. The primary source of the trauma is relational: the irreconcilable difference of the child and the adult. Before the trauma there exists a tie of love between the adult and the child. The child plays out its desire on the level of tenderness, imagination and play. The adult has a different form of desire, he interprets the process sexually, with the language of passion. Adult passion intrudes into the child’s world brutally, the child starts to panic. To defend itself its only possibility is to identify with the aggressor. Not becoming aggressive, but accepting as normal its position and also introjecting the guilt feeling of the aggressor. Connected to the psychoanalytic views of Ferenczi I discuss parallel philosophical positions (Merleau-Ponty, Giorgio Agamben) concerning the figure of the child and analyze a few literary-poetical examples.

Julianna Vamos - Free to Move – Free to Be
The Hungarian Pikler-Loczy Institute for Infants’ Well-being and Healthy Development could not have been created without the fundamental contribution of the Budapest School’s approach to Object Relations. For historical reasons, there is very little known in psychoanalytical circles about this extraordinary experience.
The space for partnership and reciprocity, and space for “true” autonomy, is an original model created by Pikler, with central importance given to the baby’s self-initiated motor development: “freedom to move”.
We will present video sequences of this universe of solicitude. The atmosphere of this world around babies is en resonance with Ferenczi’s reflections in his Clinical Diary, and what he “dreamed” of as the necessity of a caring early environment provided through adult tenderness.

Kathleen Kelley-Lainé - Freedom to Grow: Inspired by Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary
This paper will explore how psychoanalysis can create a space in which immature, infantile psychic processes can be identified, elaborated and transformed, enabling the subject to emerge. A clinical example will illustrate the case of a young woman who after three years in analysis was able to break free of archaic, infantile fantasies and develop her career as a musician.
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