Freud Museum London: Psychoanalysis Podcasts A treasure trove of ideas in psychoanalysis, exploring its history and theory, and bringing psychoanalytic perspectives to bear on a diverse range of topics. Freud Museum website: www.freud.org.uk

July 15, 2014  

Di Massimo and Salecl analyse recent projects of Di Massimo's art practice such as ‘The Lustful Turk’ (2012/13), ‘Me Mum Mister Mad’ (2014) and his recent show at Rowing. The discussion will explore these projects under the lens of Salecl’s psychoanalytic approach, especially focusing on her essay ‘Love and Sexual Difference’ published in Sexuation (2000), a book of essays on Lacan's theories of sexual difference. The conversation will then evolve towards Salecl's last books, On Anxiety (2004) and Tyranny of Choice (2010), discussing the different approaches these works give rise to in contemporary artistic practice today.

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July 7, 2014  

Dany Nobus: It's a Poor Sort of Memory that Only Works Backwards

In this paper, I will argue that the controversial issue concerning the truth value of human memories is in itself a false debate. With reference to the reality of the event that is being recalled, memories are always by definition false. In terms of the subjective experience of the one who is remembering, they are always by definition true. Hence, from a psychoanalytic perspective memories are always simultaneously objectively false and subjectively true, and this can be the starting point for a re-evaluation of Freud's significance for contemporary 'scientific' discussions on the substance and function of memory.
 
Sharon Kivland: Last Year
I am trying to remember a film. It is film about the construction of memory (I think), as it might take place during a psychoanalysis, though I have only half an hour today rather than several years. I have watched the film, as I have done many times before, since 1970 in fact; this time, for a week, trying not to fall asleep at the point I have fallen asleep in it for the last forty-three years. Each time I have awoken, I have tried to remember what I saw last, before I slept. This is a film reconstructed through memory. This is a screen memory. In a series of flashbacks, I try to go back to a founding moment – I do not believe this to be true, but it still works.
 
Alasdair Hopwood: Closing Remarks
 
These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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July 7, 2014  

Martin Conway: False Memories in the Remembering-Imaging System

What do memories represent? At best they represent some fragments derived from our experience of a past event. That ‘experience’ may have intersected with ‘reality’ to some degree. So the fragments preserved in memory derive from our experience of reality, also to some degree. The brain non-consciously and automatically ‘fills in’, by making unconscious inferences, much of the detail of a ‘memory’. Memories are constructed in the remembering-imaging system (RIS), where future events are also imagined, as well alternative pasts. In this paper I consider how errors and false memories can arise in the RIS for past and future events.
 
Chris French: Memory for Trauma
This talk will present an overview of research investigating the nature of memory for traumatic events with a particular focus upon examining the Freudian notion of repression. The idea that the experience of trauma often results in the automatic and involuntary repression of memories into the unconscious mind is critically assessed and the risk that the search for such memories can result in the production of false memories is discussed.

These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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July 7, 2014  
Alasdair Hopwood: Introductory Remarks

Fiona Gabbert: The Psychology of False Memory
Is it possible to develop a 'memory' for something that was not experienced? Plenty of evidence now exists to suggest that it is possible ...but how does this happen, and can we distinguish false memories from our 'real' memories? This seminar provides an overview of how psychologists investigate the phenomenon of false memories, and what the findings can tell us about how our memories work. The implications of this body of research will also be discussed with reference to real life examples.

These recordings may not be further used or cited without the express permission of the speakers.
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