Freud Museum London: Psychoanalysis Podcasts A treasure trove of ideas in psychoanalysis. History, theory, and psychoanalytic perspectives on a diverse range of topics. www.freud.org.uk

November 14, 2011  

Playing with dynamite: A personal approach to forensic psychotherapy

A talk by Estela Welldon at the Freud Museum on 10 November 2011.

Estela Welldon discusses her personal understanding of perversions, violence and criminality based on her many years experience at the Portman Clinic and her latest bookPlaying with Dynamite.

'Estela Welldon has taught a whole generation of clinicians to question their idealisation of the mother-child relation. In this superb new study, she challenges both popular and professional preconceptions about perversion, violence, and crime. Drawing on years of research and clinical practice, she shows us the importance of thinking before blaming, and gives us the clinical and conceptual tools to do so. A brave and deeply humane work, this invites us to go beyond gut moralism and to enter the minds of those it is always easier to incarcerate than to understand.’ Darian Leader, psychoanalyst

Estela Welldon is a psychotherapist who worked for many years at the Portman Clinic and in private practice. She is the founder of the International Association for Forensic Psychotherapy and a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists. She is most famous for her book Mother, Madonna Whore: The Idealization and Denigration of Motherhood (1988) which quashed the myth that ‘perversion’ was largely a male preserve and opened up a whole new field of therapeutic enquiry. She is the author ofSadomasochism (2002) and principal editor of A Practical Guide to Forensic Psychotherapy (1997). Her latest publication is Playing with Dynamite: A Personal Approach to the Understanding of Perversions, Violence and Criminality (Karnac, 2011)

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November 11, 2011  

Author's Talk: Marilyn's Last Sessions

Michel Schneider in Conversation with Lisa Appignanesi

A special event from the Freud Museum London, held at the Anna Freud Centre on 1 November 2011.

4.25 am, 5 August 1962, West Los Angeles Police Department ‘Marilyn Monroe has died of an overdose’, a man’s voice says dully. And when the stunned policeman asked ‘What?’, the same voice struggled to repeat ‘Marilyn Monroe has died. She has committed suicide.’

In the three years running up to this phonecall, psychoanalyst Dr Ralph Greenson became the most important person in Marilyn Monroe’s life. They met almost every day. He was her analyst, her friend and her confessor. He was the last person to see her alive, and the first to see her dead.

In this highly acclaimed novel, based on the transcripts of their meetings, Marilyn’s last years are brilliantly recreated. It is the story of the world’s most famous and elusive actress, told partially in her own words.

The book raises questions about the increasingly blurred lines between fact and fiction, as well as giving powerful insight into the workings of Hollywood and its close links with psychoanalysis.

Michel Schneider has written on psychoanalysis, Baudelaire, Proust, Schumann and Glenn Gould. His essay collection, Morts Imaginaires (Grasset, 2003), won the Médicis Essay Award. He lives in France.

Lisa Appignanesi is a writer, broadcaster and chair of trustees of the Freud Museum London. Her most recent book All about Love, is an intimate and illuminating look at how love shapes our lives and our world.

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November 8, 2011  

On Saturday 29th October 2011, the Freud Museum Public Programme held a one day conference, “Psychotherapy without foundations?” at the Anna Freud Centre, 12 Maresfield Gardens, London, NW3 5SH.

Podcast 4 of 4

Session 4: Training

John Heaton:

Wittgenstein and the implications for the training of psychotherapists.

Del Loewenthal and Robert Snell:

A training in post-existentialism - towards a therapy without foundations.

Bice Benvenuto - Respondent.

followed by a group discussion.

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November 8, 2011  

On Saturday 29th October 2011, the Freud Museum Public Programme held a one day conference, “Psychotherapy without foundations?” at the Anna Freud Centre, 12 Maresfield Gardens, London, NW3 5SH.

Podcast 3 of 4

Session 3: Theory and Research

Julia Cayne:

Researching the between as unknown: Post-phenomenology for practice, theory and research.

Phil Mollon - Respondent.

followed by a group discussion.

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November 8, 2011  

On Saturday 29th October 2011, the Freud Museum Public Programme held a one day conference, “Psychotherapy without foundations?” at the Anna Freud Centre, 12 Maresfield Gardens, London, NW3 5SH.

Podcast 2 of 4

Session 2: Therapeutic Practice

Tom Cotton:

Laing and ‘the treatment is the way we treat people’

Rhiannon Thomas:

Language, experience and misrepresentation:

The case of Lola Voss

Haya Oakley - Respondent.

followed by a group discussion.

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November 8, 2011  

On Saturday 29th October 2011, the Freud Museum Public Programme held a one day conference, “Psychotherapy without foundations?” at the Anna Freud Centre, 12 Maresfield Gardens, London, NW3 5SH.

Podcast 1 of 4

Session 1:  Introduction

Del Loewenthal:

On the very idea of a therapy without foundations.

Robert Hinshelwood - Respondent

followed by group discussion.

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November 8, 2011  

An exclusive event at the Freud Museum London.  On 26 October 2011 at 7pm:

Barbara Loftus in Conversation with Monica Bohm-Duchen

Artist Barbara Loftus discusses her exhibition Sigismund’s Watch: A Tiny Catastrophe, with the shows curator Monica Bohm-Duchen.Sigismund’s Watch: A Tiny Catastrophe is a beautifully executed and intellectually thought-provoking cycle of artworks, prompted by the recollections of the artist’s mother Hildegard, who fled from Germany to England as a Jewish refugee in 1939. The story is told through a series of oil paintings and works on paper, vividly contextualised by documentary images and quotations from the Weimar period.

Barbara Loftus is a figurative painter who also makes artist’s bookworks. She combines a traditional studio practice with performed re-enactment, historical research and digital media to feed into her image making process.

Monica Bohm-Duchen is an independent writer, lecturer and exhibition organiser. The institutions for which she has worked include the Tate Gallery, the National Gallery, The Royal Academy of the Arts and the Courtauld Institute. The publications to which she has contributed include The Jewish Quarterly, RA Magazine, Art Monthly and Modern Painters.